The Beak: Electing A New Connecticut State Bird - March Madness Style

Will it be the crow? The woodcock? The Oystercatcher? Tune in to find out!

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Chion Wolf
Julia Pistell.
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Julia Pistell.
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Julia's choices.
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Dan Russell.
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Dan Russell.
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Dan Russell.
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Patrick Comins.
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Chion Wolf
Chion Wolf (montage) - all photos Flickr Creative Commons
The Beak: Electing A New Connecticut State Bird - March Madness Style
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The Beak: Electing A New Connecticut State Bird - March Madness Style

The Robin has had it too easy for too long here in Connecticut. It was named our state bird by law in 1943. And what has it done since then? The robin's scientific name is turdus migratorius, but, as you may have noticed, not all of them do migrate. A small percentage of robins, for whatever reason stick around during the winter. More of them are males than females, which figures. "I'm cold? Are you cold?" That's just Stuff Female Robins Say.

The males who stay here have a big advantage when everybody else comes back, because they will have occupied all the prime breeding territories for several weeks. So if any of this is due to genetic wiring, we should see more and more winter robins.

Meanwhile, prompted by a column in the Danbury News Times, we decided to put the Connecticut state bird job in play. And now that the men's basketball team has lost, some of you need a new rooting interest. So let's go.

Leave your comments below, e-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.


  

Comments

Big Bird!

What a wonderful idea. Given that Caroll Spinney is a longtime CT resident, the selection of Big Bird as a new state bird seems a no-(bird)brainer.

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I like the pigeons because as an inner city youth they taught me about how to court a mate.