Instagram The World: What Cell Phone Photography Says About Us

Photos are going from "things" to "experiences".

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Instagram The World: What Cell Phone Photography Says About Us
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Instagram The World: What Cell Phone Photography Says About Us

Here is Instagram by the numbers:

The number you're mostly likely to know is $1 billion, which is what Facebook paid to buy Instagram, a photo-sharing phone application.

Instagram has 30 million registered users.

Those users have uploaded over 1 billion photos.

The current rate is 5 million photos per day.

Instagram users click "like"  575 times per second.

During storm Sandy, Instagram users uploaded storm related pictures at a rate of ten per second.

It's a massive distribution system with a nigh noise to signal ratio, and yet, serious photographers are attracted to it. Time magazine ran it first instagram cover photo recently -- also storm related.

Today on the show, we'll talk to the pros about why they're not afraid to use it.

E-mail colin@wnpr.org or Tweet us @wnprcolin.


  

Comments

EMAIL FROM CARROLL:

Wonder if you heard about this absurd device called the "Memoto" that clips onto you and takes a photo every 30 seconds, basically allowing you to record your entire life?

EMAIL FROM GEORG:

One of the most memorible interviews I had was one that the interviewer used a Hasselblad. I felt special being shot by that, rather than if done by a cell phone & the interview reflected that.

EMAIL FROM JOANNE:

Love the photography show on Instagram. I have won awards at various juried photography shows and then there are times when I try something new and I am totally rejected. On my Macbook Pro there is an application called Photo Booth and I use it to make videos, such as Book of the Day (I'm also a librarian) and for self portraits. My thoughts on the iphone and cameras and computers is that we have so many ways to 'capture' pictures. I took a humorous self portrait with Photo Booth and it was rejected by a very traditional photographer from Connecticut at the West Hartford Art League Exposures show. And, with any type of capture we can make digital negatives and make alternative darkroom techniques to make handmade contact photographs. Some say digital takes over but I believe in the world of photography coming full circle. I have written about this for a grant with CT Commission on the Arts and was rejected. I guess I am very used to rejection. Anyway, great show!

EMAIL FROM KEVIN:

I am a photographer (primarily street / documentary), I have a DSLR, but I opt to use a small cameras most of the time. Just over a month ago I got my first iPhone. Until then I made fun of my fellow iPhoneographers, now I consider my self one as well. With that said I cannot stand Instagram, I treat my iPhoneography as I would if I was using a “traditional” camera.

EMAIL FROM LEA:

I enjoyed today's show regarding Instagram and Hipstamatic. I've been involved with mobile photography for many years now, well before Instagram came on the scene. I've had images on display and for sale in various venues on both coasts. I was really hoping to hear some comments from my buddy, Daniel Berman, founder of the Mobile Photography Awards (http://www.mobilephotoawards.com/), for an added perspective on the topic. I know he'd been trying to call in but there just wasn't time to hear from him. There's so much more to it aside from the photo-journalistic and wedding photography aspects. There are fine art collectors spending hundreds (if not thousands) of dollars on mobile images. I beg of you to do a follow-up show to bring this aspect to light. If I can be of any assistance, I'd be happy to contribute, or provide contact info for people who are better spokespersons than myself.

Thanks, again, to you and your staff for covering such a wonderfully diverse variety of topics on your show.