Where We Live: Ted Koppel

A conversation between Koppel and John Dankosky at the Mark Twain House.

Slideshow
<< Previous
0 of 1 Images
Next >>
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Photo by Chion Wolf
Where We Live: Ted Koppel
Download Audio
Audio Playlist
Where We Live: Ted Koppel

For 25 years, Ted Koppel came into America’s living rooms as the anchor of Nightline.

That program started during the Iran Hostage crisis, and never left the air - tackling the issues of the day in long-form interviews and reports, and going on-scene to wars and conflicts. He was, until his retirement in 2005, a link between generations of newscasters, something he wrote about in his 2000 memoir "Off Camera.” He describes a Newsweek story about anchormen this way: "There's a twenty-year-old picture of me, in the middle of a row of photographs that begins with Walter Cronkite's, moves on to David Brinkley's and Dan Rather's (then mine) and then Larry King's, Rush Limbaugh's and Geraldo Rivera's. I feel like Homo Erectus on an evolutionary chart, except that we're moving in the wrong direction."

Today, a conversation with Ted Koppel from the Clemens Lecture at the Mark Twain House in Hartford. We talked about his career, the state of journalism and the world today.


  

Comments

Ted Koppel discussion

Thank you for a fascinating, mesmerizing talk. Breaks my heart to be reminded of how low public discourse has sunk in the last ten years