Faith Middleton Show: Treat Me, Not My Age; And The Great Typo Hunt

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Ed Yourdon
Faith Middleton Show: Treat Me, Not My Age; And The Great Typo Hunt
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Faith Middleton Show: Treat Me, Not My Age; And The Great Typo Hunt

 

 

Treat Me, Not My Age: A Doctor's Guide to Getting the Best Care as You or Your Loved One Gets Older

A must-have manual for anyone 40+ to take control of their health in a broken health-care system.

Too often our culture defines the aging process negatively, instead of embracing it as a natural part of life. Nowhere is this problem more pronounced than in our health-care system, where "ageist" medicine often serves to worsen our medical issues instead of helping us figure out how to address or avoid them. Whether we're forty or eighty, what we need is an insider's guide to staying healthy despite the system.

Renowned geriatrician Mark Lachs takes readers on a grand tour of adult medicine, showing how we can navigate a complex and confusing system to make the best choices for ourselves and our loved ones. With gentle humor and great wisdom, Lachs explains how being proactive and making smart decisions can lay the groundwork for a satisfying, active lifestyle that lasts well into later life. You'll find out:

*How to identify the right primary care doctor, specialist, or care facility

*Why the hospital is no place for sick people

*How to make home improvements that will keep the nursing home at bay

*Why small life changes in your forties can lead to an extra decade of good health later on

*What to think about when planning financially for your future health

 

 

The Great Typo Hunt: Two Friends Changing the World, One Correction at a Time

The signs of the times are missing apostrophes.
 
The world needed a hero, but how would an editor with no off-switch answer the call? For Jeff Deck, the writing was literally on the wall: “NO TRESSPASSING.” In that moment, his greater purpose became clear.  Dark hordes of typos had descended upon civilization… and only he could wield the marker to defeat them.
 
Recruiting his friend Benjamin and other valiant companions, he created the Typo Eradication Advancement League (TEAL). Armed with markers, chalk, and correction fluid, they circumnavigated America, righting the glaring errors displayed in grocery stores, museums, malls, restaurants, mini-golf courses, beaches, and even a national park. Jeff and Benjamin championed the cause of clear communication, blogging about their adventures transforming horor into horror, it’sinto its, and coconunut into coconut.
 
But at the Grand Canyon, they took one correction too far: fixing the bad grammar in a fake Native American watchtower.  The government charged them with defacing federal property  and summoned them to court—with a typo-ridden complaint that claimed that they had violated “criminal statues.” Now the press turned these paragons of punctuation into “grammar vigilantes,” airing errors about their errant errand..
 
The radiant dream of TEAL would not fade, though.   Beneath all those misspelled words and mislaid apostrophes, Jeff and Benjamin unearthed deeper dilemmas about education, race, history, and how we communicate. Ultimately their typo-hunting journey tells a larger story not just of proper punctuation but of the power of language and literacy—and the importance of always taking a second look.