Where We Live: Poverty in the Suburbs

By 2010, over 15% of the nation’s population lived below the poverty line

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Chion Wolf
Thomas Cooke
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Where We Live: Poverty in the Suburbs
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Where We Live: Poverty in the Suburbs

By the end of  2010, over 15 percent of the nation’s population lived below the federal poverty line— that's just over $22 thousand dollars for a family of four.

Over a ten-year span, the US saw the poor population grow by 12.3 million, driving the total number of Americans in poverty to a historic high of 46.2 million.

...and the number of those poor people living in the suburbs increased by 25%. New research from the Brookings Institute explores how poverty is shifting from inner cities to the suburbs.

Today, we’ll explore these trends. We’ll look at New England cities, which have a higher poverty rate than the national, average - and see what’s happening in Connecticut suburbs.

 
This program was produced with assistance from Betsy Kaplan. 

  

Comments

The Brookings study may have

The Brookings study may have been a bit misleading to some people (including your show) if you don't look closely at the details. For example Waterbury is counted as a suburb of New Haven.

Furthermore, poverty has dramatically increased since 2009 in all areas. Unfortunately the studies you are citing here were all based on numbers from 2005 through 2008. I wish y'all would use 2010 figures!