Changing Health Outcomes

A Forum on Health Inequity in Connecticut

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Dr. M. Natalie Achong, Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Yale School of Medicine
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Alta Lash, Executive Director, United Connecticut Action for Neighborhoods
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Russell Melmed, Epidemiologist, Ledge Light Health District, Groton
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A Rapt Audience
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Enjoying the Company
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Secretary Ben Barnes, Office of Policy and Management, and Vicki Veltri, Connecticut Healthcare Advocate
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Enjoying a Snack Before the Forum
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A Guest at WNPR's Health Equity Forum
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Food Provided by Litchfield Saltwater Grille
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Having Fun at the Forum
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Meeting Friends
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Our Supportive and Participatory Audience
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John Dankosky, WNPR News Director and Host of Where We Live
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Old Friends
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Patricia Baker, Connecticut Health Foundation
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Sanford Cloud, Chairman of the Board, Connecticut Health Foundation
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Maryland Grier, Connecticut Health Foundation
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Producers Patrick Skahill, Betsy Kaplan, and Heather Brandon
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Welcome
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Heather Brandon
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Changing Health Outcomes
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Changing Health Outcomes

 

A few weeks ago, the Greater New Haven Branch of the NAACP released a report showing significant health, economic, and educational disparities between White and minority populations....so significant that they’re calling it a modern day “urban apartheid.”

In Connecticut, pregnant black women are 2x more likely to deliver a smaller baby early, Black men are 2x more likely to die of prostate cancer than White men...with overall life expectancy for Black men significantly shorter than for their White peers.

But  why does this disparity exist?  And what can we do to change it?

Today, where we live, we’ll listen to a live conversation we taped in front of a studio audience as part of our Health Equity Project.

We’ll ask why is it so difficult to close the disparity gap in one of the wealthiest states in the nation....and we’ll be joined by a community organizer, an epidemiologist doing health “mapping,” and a physician who’s made health disparities her focus.

Leave your comments below, join us on Facebook, or tweet us @wherewelive.